Shark Research 

I have had the tremendous opportunity to be a photographer for the University of Miami Shark Research and Conservation Team.  My role is to document the action during weekly expeditions and create educational, scientific, marketing, and social media content.

 

This page highlights some of the projects I have contributed to during my 50+ expeditions.

 

 

Why We Must Go

Photo of myself descending into the depths with a Great Hammerhead Shark. 

Photo of myself descending into the depths with a Great Hammerhead Shark. 

With haste, we make our way towards the open ocean.  I sit aboard the RV Garvin, or the “Wahoo” as she was known to Captain Bielinda and the famed Atlantic Wreck Divers crew.  This vessel was a carriage to many great discoveries; countless famous firsts on famous shipwrecks.  As the “Wahoo,” she carried seasoned technical divers to some of the most treacherous locations on Earth.  Places where man is unfit to go.  The exploration of such places requiring the latest tools, and for every piece of the puzzle to fall oh so perfectly into place to ensure the continued operation of a human life. We cannot survive but for a few fleeting minutes below the ocean’s surface.  Without the aid of SCUBA, one begins dying the moment one enters this alien world.  And yet, we go.  Mankind has a deep and necessary tie to the ocean.  We depend on the sea for our survival; for our food, our global trade, and our growth.  Therefore, we must go. 

We go today to learn, to attempt to reconnect man to the place where he was born.  The umbilical has long been broken, however this doesn’t change the fact that what is within us came from the sea.  A vicious, tormenting, unfair place, it is no surprise it bears such strong resemblance to the human psyche.

Getting up-close and personal with a Great Hammerhead Shark!  (I'm wearing the blue shirt) 

Getting up-close and personal with a Great Hammerhead Shark!  (I'm wearing the blue shirt) 

I sit below-deck.  The roar of the engine fills me with excitement.  The constant creaking and moaning of a nearly 40-year-old hull ensures we are moving forward.  With a loud “clank,” the roar becomes a soft but ever-present hum.  The confident voice of the captain comes on the loudspeaker: “SRC, SRC, clear to drop.”  I make my way to the aft deck and watch the first baited-hook plummet to the seafloor.  And so begins our attempt to bridge the gap between Earth’s greatest predator, and the ocean’s.